Weird Worlds v3 #2, 1972 - A showcase for Edgar Rice Burroughs' less known heroes, the series features John Carter, Warlord of Mars and David Innes in Pellucidar. Alan Weiss ably draws the latter feature, aided by C. Bunker, an abbreviation of "Crusty Bunker". This pseudonym was used during the bronze age by an informal group of artists, often led by Neal Adams. Weiss' style has a striking similarity, but as the story progresses Adams' inks become more recognizable. His detailed shading adds dimension and clarity to the pencils. Other artists in this issue include Murphy Anderson and Joe Orlando (cover). This is number 1 of 2 Weird Worlds issues with Adams art and/or covers.
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"Slaves of the Mahars" Adams story partial inks (Alan Weiss pencils, partial inks) 12 pages = ***

Neal Adams
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Ghost Manor v2 #18, 1974 - Stranded in a western ghost town, a woman befriends a young man with old-fashioned tastes. Steve Ditko's clean, simple lines are appealing, but perhaps need a tad more detail. The style and approach is consistent with his other tales for the same publisher. Don Newton (in his first professional comics work) tells of a couple moving into their new house. His drawings are moody and atmospheric, often using shadows for dramatic effect (see splash page below). Newton's layouts are varied enough to maintain interest without sacrificing storytelling. The corresponding cover, drawn by Tom Sutton, fails to match the tone of the story. Still, unlike other artists, Newton delivers a splendid and thoughtful piece in his debut. Other artists in this issue include Sanho Kim.
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"A Lonely Place" Ditko story pencils and inks 7 pages = **
"The Empty Room" Newton story pencils and inks 7 pages = ****


Don Newton
Steve Ditko
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Captain Marvel v2 #41, 1975 - The space-born hero travels back to his Kree homeworld, accompanied by partner Rick Jones. Artist Al Milgrom is inked by Bob McCleod, P. Craig Russell and surprisingly, Bernie Wrightson (who did few comics by the mid 1970s). His handiwork is seen on pages 2-4, 8 and 9, adding greater depth and interest to each scene. Wrightson's strongest contribution is toward the front of the book: a wide two-page panel of Captain Marvel's descent toward his native planet. This is number 1 of 2 Captain Marvel issues with Wrightson art and/or covers.
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"Havoc On Homeworld" Wrightson partial story inks (Al Milgrom pencils, P. Craig Russell, Bob McCleod partial inks) = ***


Captain Marvel v2 #41 marvel 1970s bronze age comic book page art by Bernie Wrightson
Bernie Wrightson
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Wonder Woman v1 #195, 1971 - During an era when Wonder Woman temporarily lost her powers, her adventures sometimes included tales bordering on the gothic. Wally Wood, no stranger to mystery tales, inks series artist Mike Sekowsky's pencils, reinvigorating them. A tad more roughly applied than usual, the artist's brushwork nonetheless adds greater spontaneity and visual appeal. The opening scenes are particularly good, portraying the snow-covered landscapes of the story's initial setting. This is number 1 of 2 Wonder Woman issues with Wood art and/or covers.
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"The House That Wasn't" Wood story inks (Mike Sekowsky pencils) 22 pages = ***
 

Wonder Woman v1 #195 dc 1970s bronze age comic book page art by Wally Wood
Wally Wood
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Eerie v4 #106, 1979 - On this heavily typographic cover, Walt Simonson provides new background art to Jose Ortiz's artwork. The scene itself borrows panel art from an interior story. Unfortunately, Simonson's work is barely recognizable with little benefit to the busy cover. Other artists in this issue include Richard Corben and John Severin.
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Simonson partial cover pencils and inks = *

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Western Kid v1 #10, 1956 - A young cowboy shows off his precision shooting skills for the crowd's entertainment. Despite being only four pages, the tale is told in uncommonly large panels. Al Williamson's loose yet carefully designed drawings may have been inked by frequent collaborator Angelo Torres (?). Curiously, the last page employs more fine lines and cross-hatching, a noticeable change from the heavy blacks on previous pages. Fortunately, the inconsistency is only mildly distracting. This story was later reprinted in Wyatt Earp v5 #30. Other artists this issue include John Romita. Cover by Joe Maneely. This is number 2 of 2 Western Kid issues with Williamson art and/or covers.
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"Genius with a Gun" Williamson story pencils and inks 4 pages = ***

Al Williamson

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Frank Frazetta
From Personal Love #24, this page epitomizes why Frank Frazetta is the greatest comic book artist of the golden age.

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(Walt Disney presents) Zorro v2 #2, 1966 - This issue contains the first reprinting of Dell's Four Color Comics v2 #960, including both features and the inside back cover. Though Gold Key's versions are slightly smaller than the originals, this series does an nice job at reproducing Alex Toth's artwork.

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Matt Baker
Secrets of True Love v1 #1, 1958 - A pretty girl catches the eye of a sailor, but his buddy tries to convince him otherwise. Matt Baker has used this theme before on the cover of Wartime Romances #17. The setting changes from a bar to a diner and the woman is dressed more plainly. The composition is drastically different, with an emphasis on the woman's face. While less detailed than the other cover, Baker opts for greater depth in this version. This is number 1 of 1 Secrets of True Love issues with Baker art and/or covers.
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Baker cover pencils and inks = ***

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Strange Tales v1 #161 nick fury shield comic book cover art by Jim Steranko
Jim Steranko
Strange Tales v1 #161 featuring Nick Fury & Doctor Strange, 1967 - Nick Fury and Captain America enlist the aid of Mr. Fantastic and the Thing to stop an inter-dimensional army. Jim Steranko's artwork continues to improve, using dynamic illustrations with precision details. Fury and Cap fight against overwhelming odds on an excellent splash page, but it's the two page spread at the very end that jars the senses. A wide panorama reveals the high-tech headquarters of the invasion's mastermind, the Yellow Claw. Other artists in this issue include Dan Adkins. This is number 11 of 18 Strange Tales issues with Steranko art and/or covers.
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Steranko cover pencils and inks = ***
"Project Blackout pt 2" Steranko story pencils and inks 12 pages = ***

Strange Tales v1 #161 nick fury shield comic book page art by Jim Steranko
Jim Steranko
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John Byrne
Web of Spider-Man v1 #5, 1985 - Expertly drawn and composed, John Byrne's cover displays a triumphant Doctor Octopus standing over his most hated foe. His lime green goggles, gloves and pants contrast against the reddish background. Note also how Spider-Man's figure nicely fills the negative space below. Other artists in this issue include Greg LaRocque. This is number 3 of 4 Web of Spider-Man issues with Byrne art and/or covers.
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Byrne cover pencils and inks = ***

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Jim Starlin
DC Comics Presents v1 #37, 1981 - Discovering an ancient Kryptonian chamber on Earth, Hawkgirl enlists Superman's aid in solving the mystery. Jim Starlin's last story on the series is very good, from the opening splash of Kypton's red sun to a perfectly sequenced history of Superman's ancestor (page 7). Starlin pencils and inks much of the tale, but there are plenty of panels that suggest inker Romeo Tanghal's hand. Rip Hunter, Time Master also appears in a new back-up feature. Other artists in this issue include Alex Saviuk and Vince Colletta. This is number 6 of 7 DC Comics Presents issues with Starlin art and/or covers.
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Starlin cover pencils and inks = ***
"The Stars, Like Moths..." Starlin story pencils, partial inks (Romeo Tanghal? partial inks) 18 pages = ***

Jim Starlin
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